05/09/2017

 

 





   MCI adds to new coach, pre-owned coach sales teams
 

Motor Coach Industries (MCI), a subsidiary of New Flyer Industries Inc., announced that Shane Shipman has joined MCI as new coach sales VP, southeastern U.S. He is taking over the territory from Brian Lichter, who is returning to MCI Pre-Owned Coach sales representative for the Midwest, effective May 1.

From Metro:

Motor Coach Industries (MCI), a subsidiary of New Flyer Industries Inc., announced that Shane Shipman has joined MCI as new coach sales VP, southeastern U.S. He took over the territory from Brian Lichter, who is returning to MCI Pre-Owned Coach sales representative for the Midwest on 05/01.

Shipman will be responsible for MCI customers in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee, and reports to Pat Ziska, New Coach Sales VP.

“Our sales teams are the frontline connection to MCI customers and they are dedicated to reliably serving our customers,” said Patrick Scully, executive VP, sales and marketing. “Shane and Brian are part of a company-wide team that understands the everyday operating needs of every customer we have. Sales go beyond the purchase to keep our customers on the road so our customers can focus on growing their business.”

Shipman has a 21-year career in motor coach operations including general manager positions with two major motorcoach operators based in Atlanta and as director of Megabus.com Southeast. He was also director of charter sales and operations for Coach America, working at its Orlando, Fla., and Atlanta locations.

With the return of Brian Lichter to pre-owned coach sales, MCI is expanding in the midwest by dividing the territory into two separate regions. Lichter will be responsible for customers in Minnesota, Wisconsin, South Dakota, North Dakota, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, and Missouri. Bob Dethloff remains responsible for customers in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan................. READ MORE>

 
  Crumbling roads and bridges bring higher taxes and fees
 

From Associated Press :

For the first time in nearly 30 years, Tennessee will soon tax motorists more to fill their tanks. So will California, Indiana and Montana.

Lawmakers across the U.S. have approved new proposals this year to pay for transportation improvements, including tax hikes, vehicle fee increases and bond packages. Those measures extended an existing trend to a new milestone: Two-thirds of all states have stepped up highway funding over the past five years.

Lawmakers across the U.S. have approved new proposals this year to pay for transportation improvements, including tax hikes, vehicle fee increases and bond packages. Those measures extended an existing trend to a new milestone: Two-thirds of all states have stepped up highway funding over the past five years.

It's happening in both Democratic- and Republican-led states as their transportation departments strain to overcome backlogs deepened by the last recession. And lawmakers are acting regardless of promises from President Donald Trump for a $1 trillion national infrastructure program that his administration has yet to detail.

Some state officials doubt that Trump's plan will make much of a difference when it comes to repairing and replacing thousands of old bridges or repaving and widening countless miles of congested roads.

"We really don't know what's in it. We haven't seen anything," said Tennessee state Rep. Eddie Smith, a Republican from Knoxville. But "it sounded like there wasn't going to be a lot that we would directly benefit from."

Trump has said his plan will depend partly on spurring private investment in infrastructure. That could include tax incentives for those who subsidize big-ticket projects, with an expectation that investors could recoup costs through tolls or fares on roads, bridges, rail systems or airports. Tennessee currently uses neither tolls nor bonds for its highway system.

At least two dozen states adopted higher fuel or sales taxes to pay for transportation improvements.

"That's highly unusual for that many states to be in agreement about raising taxes, and these are oftentimes fairly conservative states as well," said Carl Davis, research director at the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, a Washington-based nonprofit think tank.

The U.S. has an $836 billion backlog of needed repairs and improvements to roads and bridges, plus an additional $90 billion backlog for public transit systems, according to the Federal Highway Administration.  Those needs have grown as the money available from the Federal Highway Trust Fund for states fell by more than 9 percent from 2010 to 2015, according to an Associated Press analysis of the most recent figures from the highway administration.

A 2015 federal law increases Highway Trust Fund money for states by $20 billion over five years through traditional matching funds and new competitive grants. But some financial analysts project that will merely hold funding flat when accounting for inflation.  States are "bellying up to the bar and actually increasing their own gas taxes to make up for the lack of an increase of federal spending," said Julius Vizner, an assistant vice president at Moody's Investors Service.

Earlier this year, Wyoming enacted a law that doubles vehicle and driver's license fees. The measure, coming four years after a 10-cent gas tax hike, is intended to free up money in the state's general fund, which has taken a hit because of the downturn in the energy sector.    READ MORE>

 
 
 
 
 

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  What Baby Boomers Want Millennials to Know About Social Media

By Vincent Ivan Phipps for Buses.Org

Millennials are at the apex of the social media movement. A baby boomer may argue: Who needs social media? A Gen Xer may argue that social media has its place, but cannot replace the personal touch. For millennials, social media has always been a part of their world, and they see it as an important tool for their professional future.

Boomers, remember when your parents did not even own a car, and yet you cannot imagine life without one? Gen Xers, remember when your household had only one phone, but now every person you know has his or her own personal phone? It is the same way for millennials. They view Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, and Instagram as the same necessary tools.

My office conducted a generational communication survey. With 100 participants, we had an almost perfect disparity of having approximately 33 percent of each generation being represented. Ninety-one percent of baby boomers said if social media existed during their teens and twenties, they would have used it. Of those boomers involved in the survey, 79 percent said they were currently active on at least two different social media platforms. Those same boomers had strong feelings about what they are seeing on the social media sites of today’s millennials. If you are a millennial, consider the following advice from Gen Xers and boomers about using social media for professional purposes:

  • Stop posting selfies for your professional pictures.
  • Stop making negative comments about others.
  • Stop posting pictures with negative images.
  • Stop posting personal content on LinkedIn. 
  • Start dressing professionally for your pictures.
  • Start smiling.
  • Start sharing positive posts.
  • Start sharing professional content on LinkedIn.

Whether you are a boomer, Gen Xer, or a millennial, you have an opportunity to be a mentor as well as be mentored by those with more experience. Embrace opportunities to learn from one another and understand how social media is viewed.........    READ MORE>

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