06/06/2017

 

 




  New Flyer acquires Carlson Engineered Composites
 

From Metro:

New Flyer Industries Inc. announced that it has acquired Carlson Engineered Composites Inc. and the assets of its U.S.-affiliated companies, a privately-owned composites company, headquartered in Winnipeg, Manitoba for $13 million, subject to certain normal and customary purchase price adjustments.

New Flyer Industries Inc. announced that it has acquired Carlson Engineered Composites Inc. and the assets of its U.S.-affiliated companies, a privately-owned composites company, headquartered in Winnipeg, Manitoba for $13 million, subject to certain normal and customary purchase price adjustments.

Carlson manufactures fiberglass reinforced polymer (FRP) components primarily to original equipment manufacturers of transportation vehicles and agricultural equipment, with 2016 sales exceeding $38 million. Carlson currently employs over 300 people at three production facilities totaling 235,000 square feet and located in Winnipeg, MB; St Cloud, Minn. and Anniston, Ala.

Carlson’s business began in 1985 with industrial and custom part fabrication, from which evolved a line of fibre-glass reinforced plastic (FRP) water and sewage tank manufacturing. The business later expanded with the introduction of a line of truck caps and other recreational vehicle parts. Carlson then became involved in the development and supply of FRP parts and sub-assemblies to the transportation industry.

“The acquisition of Carlson will allow us to control of one of the more critical commodities in our manufacturing supply chain”, said David White, New Flyer Group’s executive VP, Supply Management. “As we think about the businesses of Carlson and Frank Fair Industries Ltd., the Winnipeg FRP business owned by Motor Coach Industries Limited since 1991, we can explore sharing best practices in composite part manufacturing, optimizing processes, and pursuing new technologies.”

White further explained, “This acquisition follows on the very successful repatriation and in-sourcing of various metal part fabrication, machining and painting operations across the company to control quality, improve delivery performance and reduce costs for our bus manufacturing operations. Carlson’s U.S. facilities will also contribute to the company complying with the increasing U.S. content requirements under increased Buy America regulations resulting from the 2015 FAST Act for the purchase of transit buses and motor coaches by U.S.....................             READ MORE>

 

  Zero-emission buses and HVAC efficiency
 

It’s clear that the drive to zero-emission in transit vehicles has started. So, what does this have to do with the HVAC? A lot, actually. The zero emission bus is powered by batteries, and all of the electrical loads, like the all-electric HVAC, use power from the battery. As on conventional buses, the HVAC is the largest single load on the engine.

From Bus Ride.com:

It wasn’t that long ago when the conversation was about low-emission buses and alternative fuels. We saw an explosion in hybrid bus production followed by the rapid expansion of CNG- (Compressed Natural Gas) powered buses. These were good initiatives, but they can’t meet the goals in place to reduce GHG (Green House Gas) emissions. Zero-emission buses can have a significant impact on reducing Transit’s carbon footprint. California is currently developing a proposal to reduce emissions from transit bus fleets by phasing-in zero emission bus purchases, with the goal of transforming all fleets to zero-emission by 2040.

This will be a lengthy transformation, and costly, considering that the zero-emission bus can cost up to two times more than a conventional bus. At the end of 2016, we had just over 300 zero emission buses operating in the United States.

It’s clear that the drive to zero-emission in transit vehicles has started. So, what does this have to do with the HVAC? A lot, actually. The zero emission bus is powered by batteries, and all of the electrical loads, like the all-electric HVAC, use power from the battery. As on conventional buses, the HVAC is the largest single load on the engine. Now, the load is on the battery and affects how far the bus can go on a single charge. It is easy to understand that reducing the load allows the bus range to improve. But, do we dare turn off the air conditioner? This isn’t likely, but the industry can demand more efficient systems from HVAC suppliers.

You might be surprised to learn that HVAC suppliers have been driving for more efficient systems for 20 years. On diesel-driven systems, improved HVAC efficiency always meant better fuel economy and a reduction in a number of known pollutants like: carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur oxides (SOx), and particulate matter (PM). The concept is not new, but the approach to improved HVAC efficiency................   READ MORE>

 

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  Cummins OKs Renewable Diesel for B6.7, L9 School Bus Engines
 

From School Transportation News:

News that Cummins, Inc. approved paraffinic fuels for its B6.7 and L9 school bus engines could be the push needed to open the renewable diesel market to the student transporters.

The conclusion resulted from an 18-month field trial of paraffinic fuels Cummins performed to compare efficiencies and differences with standard diesel. Cummins determined that the paraffinic renewable diesel met EN 15940 specifications and is now approved for B6.7 and L9 engine platforms as well as the company's B4.5 that meets Euro 6 emissions standards.

Paraffinic fuel is a near-zero sulphur diesel made through the Fischer-Tropsch process from natural gas or biomass, or through hydrotreatment process from vegetable oils or animal fats (HVO).

Paraffinic fuel is a near-zero sulphur diesel made through the Fischer-Tropsch process from natural gas or biomass, or through hydrotreatment process from vegetable oils or animal fats (HVO). It is not considered biodiesel but instead is a 100-percent fuel substitute for standard diesel. Cummins confirmed on May 31 that paraffinic renewable diesel neither requires any modifications to the Cummins engines nor additives nor any additional vehicle infrastructure.

Paraffinic is not considered biodiesel but instead is a 100-percent fuel substitute for standard diesel. Cummins confirmed on May 31 that paraffinic renewable diesel neither requires any modifications to the Cummins engines nor additives nor any additional vehicle infrastructure.

Cummins added in a statement that “…paraffinic diesel fuels offer the potential to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 40 percent to 90 percent over the total life cycle of the vehicle.” The company also emphasized that paraffinic diesel allows customers to minimize their emissions-based footprints without the need to increase costs.

An estimated 85 percent to 90 percent of the nation's 480,000 school buses currently operate on standard Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel. The news from Cummins indicates that, slowly but surely, other engine OEMs are likely to make similar strides toward's even cleaner diesel alternatives.  One obstacle to widespread acceptance of renewable diesel, or RD, has been as well cost, reportedly a $0.10 more per gallon premium over standard diesel. And historically, RD has not been a domestically produced fuel.

Still, at least one school district - San Jose Unified in California's SIlicon Valley - has moved toward RD to power 100 percent of its school buses. Lead Equipment Mechanic Andrew DeBolt confirmed that district recently completed the sale of all remaining CNG school buses and replacement with clean diesel school buses that utilize RD.  Debolt also said the district is purchasing Neste Renewable Diesel from Western States Oil at a competitive price compared to standard ULSD.

Renewable diesel It isn’t the most economic selection as of yet, of which why rural nations still prefer standard diesel over eco-friendly alternatives, but cost effectiveness is an agenda underway and pressed because of progressive traction.  READ MORE>

 
 
     
 

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