09/12/2017

 

 



  MCI completes 13-motorcoach Coach Atlantic order

From Metro:

Motor Coach Industries (MCI), a subsidiary of New Flyer Industries Inc., announced Coach Atlantic, one of Canada's most diversified transportation operators, is completing a 13-coach MCI order with the delivery of a new 2018 J4500, making the Prince Edward Island carrier the first in Canada to put MCI's "revolutionary" new coach into service.

The 2018 J4500 has been making news for a landmark interior design that's added more comfort, space, and a significant number of aesthetic improvements, all features Coach Atlantic wanted to be first to offer its customers.

 

 

Motor Coach Industries (MCI), a subsidiary of New Flyer Industries Inc., announced Coach Atlantic, one of Canada's most diversified transportation operators, is completing a 13-coach MCI order with the delivery of a new 2018 J4500, making the Prince Edward Island carrier the first in Canada to put MCI's "revolutionary" new coach into service.

"The motor coach Industry is changing," said Mike Cassidy, President Coach Atlantic Group. "Today's customers realize their bus is an integral part of their travel experience and expect new, comfortable equipment with all the amenities.  Successful motor coach operators understand the competitive edge of having new luxury buses to meet the expectations of their customers."

Coach Atlantic offers corporate/VIP charters, scheduled line run bus service, local commuter services, airport transportation, school and team transport, and wedding and event services. The members of the Coach Atlantic Group include the operating companies of Prince Edward Tours, Coach Atlantic, Maritime Bus, Airport Express, Courier Express, and T3 Transit.

The order was announced earlier this year at UMA Expo, with MCI New Coach Sales VP Pat Ziska. She added that the original 13-coach deal was significant not only for a private company, but one with such a dominant name in Canadian transportation.

"We're pleased Coach Atlantic will be the first operator to put the new 2018 J4500 on the road in Canada," Ziska said. "Nothing makes us happier than great feedback from passengers, and we can't wait to hear how well the newest J4500 will serve their ridership." Coach Atlantic operates throughout New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and Prince Edward Island.

The MCI J4500 is a fitting choice, thanks to its reputation for head-turning looks inside and out, while offering the lowest total cost of operation in the industry. Coach Atlantic's models are equipped with the latest clean-diesel Cummins engine technology and features. These include electronic stability, ZF independent suspension for great handling, plus new sleekly styled Amaya extra-legroom seating for 56 passengers, enjoying the 110-volt power outlets and USB ports for work and play.

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  Stertil-Koni introduces new lift adapter

Stertil-Koni announced a differential adapter that has been engineered to safely and easily lift vehicles by the rear differential using the company's high-pressure, telescopic piston Diamondlift.

The adapter is built for lifting and servicing pickup trucks of all sizes, as well as smaller school buses, with a maximum axle weight of 10,000 lbs. The adapter is an ALI/ALCTV-certified acces

Stertil-Koni announced a differential adapter that has been engineered to safely and easily lift vehicles by the rear differential using the company's high-pressure, telescopic piston Diamondlift.

The Diamondlift has a lifting capacity of up to 35,000 lbs. per piston, or a total of 140,000 lbs. in the four-piston configuration.

READ MORE >

 

 
  New school buses to have seat belts under Texas law

From The Texas Tribune:

Sept. 11, 2017 - Starting this month, Texas school districts in the market for new school buses must ensure they have shoulder-to-lap seat belts for all riders.

The three-point seat belt law replaces a 2007 law that offered money to districts that opted to install seat belts in their school buses. Few districts took advantage of the funding, leaving most Texas school buses belt-less.

This "common-sense safety legislation acts on what Texans already know to be true: that seat belts save lives," Tori Sommerman, deputy director of the advocacy organization Texas Watch, said in an email.

 

Sept. 11, 2017 - Starting this month, Texas school districts in the market for new school buses must ensure they have shoulder-to-lap seat belts for all riders.

The law and its 2007 predecessor were both spurred in part by tragic accidents. In 2015, a school bus in Houston plunged from an overpass, killing two students, Janecia Chatman and Mariya Johnson. Neither of them were wearing shoulder-to-lap seat belts. The accident occurred in the state Senate district of Sen. Sylvia Garcia, D-Houston, the author of the new law. 

"Ashley and Alicia's Law," the 2007 measure, was named after two Beaumont high schoolers killed when a bus they were riding overturned in 2006. After the wreck, anguished family members said they believed seat belts might have prevented the teens' deaths. A state trooper who investigated the crash agreed. 

“Our families experienced what no parents should ever have to experience: We buried two of our children. We nursed others through painful injuries and permanent disabilities," said Steve Forman, the father of a student who was injured in the 2006 wreck, in testimony before a Senate committee in April. His daughter, Allison, was partly ejected from the bus and underwent numerous surgeries on one arm that had been trapped under the bus for about an hour. “If you can afford to build new stadiums, if you can afford digital scoreboards," he added, “then you can afford the protection that our children deserve."

The Beaumont and Houston school districts, where the crashes occurred, began requiring three-point seat belts after the accidents. But there was no state requirement until this year.

Six states, including Texas, now have some variation of a school bus seat belt law, according to a 2017 report from the National Conference of State Legislatures. 

The measure in Texas requires that three-point seat belts be in school buses that are model year 2018 or later, including buses chartered by school districts and used for events and other functions. The measure does not require that older buses be retrofitted with the restraints, and districts that cannot afford seat belts can opt out of the requirement if they hold a public meeting with a vote.

Seat belts are estimated to add $8,000 to $10,000 per bus - a price tag that's near-prohibitive for some districts, especially as the state's transportation funding formula has stayed stagnant for decades.             READ MORE >

 


 

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