05/08/2018

 






  'Super Commuters' who travel 90-plus mins. to get to work, on the rise

From Metro:

Every morning, in Stockton, Calif., Sheila James, a Department of Health and Human Services employee, rises from bed to travel three hours on two trains and a bus to reach her job in San Francisco. Across the country, in Oxford, Conn., Corey Ferrell, an electrical engineer, travels three-and-a-half hours each way to work, relying on a bicycle, two trains and a walk to reach his job in Manhattan. Finally, in Miami, housekeeper Odelie Paret’s 13.5-mile commute can take anywhere from one to three hours each way, as she relies on two buses with often unpredictable schedules to get to work.

James, Ferrell and Paret are just a few of the nearly 4 million American workers who travel 90 minutes or more each day to work.

 

While super commuters still represent a small share of the overall workforce, their long commutes have become increasingly common over the past decade.

These workers comprise a special class of commuters known as super commuters. A new Apartment List analysis of Census data shows that the ranks of super commuters swelled from 2005 to 2016 in metros across the nation. City planners, transportation experts and housing industry officials would be well-advised to consider this class of commuters as they plan for the future.

While super commuters still represent a small share of the overall workforce, their long commutes have become increasingly common over the past decade. In 2005, there were about 3.1 million super commuters, roughly 2.4% of all commuters. By 2016..............  READ MORE >...

 
  Paratransit Vehicle Pilot Leads to All-Propane Autogas Fleet

From Bus & Motorcoach News:

Delaware Transit Corp. provides over 10.6 million rides per year, including about one million passenger trips through its DART paratransit service. The transit agency runs a shared-ride program with advanced reservation trips for people with disabilities, who are unable to use regular fixed-route public transportation.

The agency, which operates the largest self-managed paratransit fleet in the nation, took on a two-year pilot program testing five propane autogas paratransit buses in 2014.


Delaware Transit Corp. provides over 10.6 million rides per year, including about one million passenger trips through its DART paratransit service. The transit agency runs a shared-ride program with advanced reservation trips for people with disabilities, who are unable to use regular fixed-route public transportation.

The agency chose to pilot two different types of vehicles, dedicated (only operating on propane) and dual-fuel (operating on gasoline or propane).  The program’s success led................ READ MORE >

 
 
 
  Pediatrics Academy Releases Special-Needs Student Transportation Recommendations

From School Bus Fleet:

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has released a policy statement that provides updated guidance on protecting students with special healthcare needs.

Published in the May 2018 issue of the journal Pediatrics, "School Bus Transportation of Children With Special Health Care Needs," by Joseph O'Neil and Benjamin D. Hoffman of the AAP Council on Injury, Violence, and Poison Prevention, gives guidance for planning safe transportation for students with special needs, and offers recommendations and considerations to the student's primary care provider for safe transportation.

The statement notes the importance of discussing transportation issues and documenting appropriate transportation plans during the student's annual Individualized Education Program meeting. The statement advises that all parties involved in the education and care of the student should be included to provide optimal input into the transportation process. Routes, proximity to first responders, and emergency plans should be discussed with school administrators, transportation directors, and the bus driver, in collaboration with the student, family, school nurse, primary care provider (if possible), teacher, and aides.


Published in the May 2018 issue of the journal Pediatrics, "School Bus Transportation of Children With Special Health Care Needs," by Joseph O'Neil and Benjamin D. Hoffman of the AAP Council on Injury, Violence, and Poison Prevention, gives guidance for planning safe transportation for students with special needs, and offers recommendations and considerations to the student's primary care provider for safe transportation

"Transportation staff who work with children with special needs can effectively conduct their daily responsibilities when provided with appropriate, documented training from the team of professionals," the authors note in the introduction to the statement.

All students should be transported safely to school in accordance with best practice guidelines, the statement advises. For example, any student who can transfer from a wheelchair should be transported in a school bus seat, because the best seating system is the school bus seat with a harness system that is appropriate for size and physical/developmental condition.

For children who are too heavy to be transferred or who cannot otherwise do so, a transit-ready wheelchair that meets WC 19 standards may be used correctly anchored to the school bus, according to the statement. The student should be restrained appropriately in the wheelchair with a postural support, if needed, and a bus-mounted lap-shoulder belt appropriately...........   READ MORE > 

 


 

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